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Indonesia finds design flaw, oversight lapses in 737 MAX crash

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Indonesia finds design flaw, oversight lapses in 737 MAX crash

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SEPTEMBER 22 (Reuters) – Indonesian investigators found that design and oversight lapses played a key role in the October crash of Boeing’s 737 MAX jet, which killed all 189 onboard, the Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday.

The preliminary findings, which should be the government’s first formal discovery of design flaws and US regulatory approval, also identify a number of pilot and maintenance errors as causal factors in the Lion Air crash, the WSJ https: // www.wsj.com / articles / indonesia-to-fault-737-max-design-us-oversight-in-lion-air-crash-report-11569185664? mod = searchresults & page = 1 & pos = 1 said.

The plane has been grounded since March after two fatal accidents in five months.

A Boeing spokesman did not comment on the newspaper’s report but said the aircraft maker continued to offer support to investigating authorities in concluding its report.

Reuters could not immediately contact Indonesian investigators to request comments.

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US air accident investigators are preparing to announce a handful of separate safety recommendations, from improving pilots’ manual flight skills to enhancing Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) verification of new aircraft designs, the report added. newspaper.

By the end of the month, the US National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is expected to request improvements in cabin training and crew decision-making and to focus on possible changes to the certification of new aircraft, the WSJ said.

The NTSB declined to comment on the WSJ report but said it planned to issue recommendations on the FAA certification program in September.

The FAA welcomed the scrutiny of security experts and looked forward to their findings, it said in a statement.

“We continue to work with other international aviation safety regulators and will carefully consider all recommendations,” he added. “The FAA will incorporate any changes that enhance our certification activities.” (Reporting by Rishika Chatterjee in Bengaluru and David Shepardson in Washington; editing by Lisa Shumaker and Clarence Fernandez)

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